3 Reasons Why the Fountain Pen Will Never Die

In the digital age, and an age where everything is fast and disposable, the fountain pen seems to be holding on to its own and surviving against all odds. Whether it be for business, education or even love, here are the strongest reasons why.

A Declaration of Intent

Despite its anachronistic element, most people see power in the fountain pen. In the realm of business, many CEOs do carry a fountain pen for not only does it denote intent, power and decisiveness, it connects to a standard of etiquette an politeness.   It tends to send out a signal that you are serious with what you are doing. Let’s try a little trick, close your eyes and envision two business leaders, one with a fairly standard ballpoint and another with a good mid ranged or high priced Montblanc or Caran D’Ache. Which of the two has more impact or seriousness in the presentation? See what I mean?

An Aspiration for Excellence

Not everyone can write with a fountain pen, precisely why ballpoints and pencils became all the rage in schools. It does take quite some skill and a little bit of refinement to use one with finesse and neatness. Not only does it become an object to aspire to but it also becomes a store of standards. Some schools, which some say as being too posh, still do dictate that fountain pens be used in writing exercises and the like. There is just something different in work done by fountain pen, and only those who have been exposed to these writing instruments can attest to its unique and intrinsic quality.

A Store of Personality

It stores your personality period. And that has never been true of any other gadget out there in the world right now. When everything else is written by email or printed out on commercial printers, why not try writing something using a fountain pen? It does not take much imagination that the once arduous or taken for granted task of writing will take on a more artistic and personal appeal. Once again close your eyes, and imagine getting a well written love letter or personal letter as against one sent via email or printed out. Which one shows more sincerity and love? Which one will give you more “oomph” per line? Enough said.

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4 thoughts on “3 Reasons Why the Fountain Pen Will Never Die

  1. I started using a fountain pen in the fourth grade. I never got used to the kind of pressure that is necessary to use many ballpoint pens. I love the way a fountain pen glides across the page, and what that does to the shape of the words that I write. At the age of 66, I still carry a fountain pen in my shirt pocket every day and use it often, despite the fact that most of my writing is done on the computer.

    I lived for many years in Japan. As you point out in your article, many CEOs and leaders of government departments or civic organizations carried and used fountain pens – very often Mont Blancs. Even if they were not using them to write, they would often take them out of their pockets and hold them in their hands during meetings – almost as if they were wielding a tiny scepter.

  2. But at some point, everyone DID write with a fountain pen, even schoolchildren. Before that, it was dip pens. I see this as a lost art which needs revival.

    • Yes it is a lost art. But not everyone misses it unfortunately. Some of the older generations say that they are glad to be rid of it, especially those who were FORCED to use it for extended periods, like what they did in government and licensure examinations for barristers and lawyers. Even then , I believe it is a beautiful thing that should be maintained and cherished. Thanks for your comment!

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